About.me and Flavors.me are examples of nameplate services. You simply upload one big photograph as the background for your personal webpage, then artfully overlay information and links to create your digital nameplate. These free sites help you pull images from your social networks or from a hard drive, then provide the tools to make the text and links work unobtrusively, though it really behooves you to check out other personal pages for an idea of what works.
Although people tend to find your site through a branded search in Google, it’s still important to make your domain easy to spell/type out. If it requires a lot of effort to type correctly, due to trying to spell it, the length or the use of un-memorable words or sounds, you’ve probably kissed goodbye to a good portion of your branding and marketing value.

It used to be the case that everyone viewed webpages on about the same size screen. But with the explosion of the use of smartphones to access the Internet, the landscape of design has completely changed. People viewing your site will now expect that it will perform regardless of the platform (smartphone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer). This ability to respond to any platform is called responsive design. This course will expand upon the basic knowledge of CSS3 to include topics such as wireframes, fluid design, media queries, and the use of existing styling paradigms such as Bootstrap. After the course, learners will be able to: ** Explain the mobile-first paradigm and the importance of wireframes in the design phase ** Create sites that behave across a range of platforms ** Utilize existing design frameworks such as Bootstrap This is the fourth course in the Web Design For Everybody specialization. A basic understanding of HTML and CSS is expected when you enroll in this class. Additional courses focus on adding interactivity with the JavaScript Programming Language and completing a capstone project.
Sass is a stylesheet language that extends CSS with features like variables, nested rules, mixins and functions, in a CSS-compatible syntax. In this course, you'll learn to use the powers of Sass to boost your front end workflow. The examples will teach you why you should use Sass in your projects. By the end, you will be writing more efficient CSS using code that is easy to read and maintain.

Search Engine Optimization Google


I bought a condo in Puerto Vallarta this last year that I am wanting to make available to friends and family. I want to create a simple, yet attractive, website with photos, descriptions, local information and an availability calendar that I can keep updated. I don’t want to use one of the major vacation rental websites as I don’t want to open the property to the world. I have no experience at all in website design, however I’m a reasonably intelligent person. How reasonable is it that I would be able to create the website I am imagining using your tutorial, and would you still think WordPress is the best option for what I am envisioning?

Back in the bad old days of non-retina screens and poor font support, sticking to sans serif fonts in your web interfaces made a lot of sense. But as both screens and font rendering technologies — not to mention, custom font support — become more robust, we’re starting to see more and more elaborate typefaces taking center stage. Or at least, much more prominent supporting roles.

There’s a huge library of goodies for you to use at Envato Elements, which range from ready to use stock images for your blog posts (250,000+ fully licensed stock photos), web templates, fonts, backgrounds and much much more.  Elements like these can save you so much time and are all ready for you to use for a single monthly subscription by signing up to Envato Elements.
We exclusively use WordPress as our CMS these days - it's by far the best option for our clients and their needs. But others may have their preferences according to the environment they're most comfortable in and the goals they're trying to meet. Regardless, over 50% of websites today use a CMS, and a large majority are in WordPress. Here's the breakdown of data from the most 1,000,000 popular sites on the web, and which CMS they use (the top 5 are listed here, full data at the link below).

There’s a lot more to building a website than making it look great.  It has to be searchable and easy to navigate.  It also needs to load fast, be search engine optimized and mobile responsive.  I will give you the best possible return on your investment.  Are you looking for a seamless experience for your website?  I accomplish this by listening to your vision and suggesting goals based on your needs.
In 1989, whilst working at CERN Tim Berners-Lee proposed to create a global hypertext project, which later became known as the World Wide Web. During 1991 to 1993 the World Wide Web was born. Text-only pages could be viewed using a simple line-mode browser.[2] In 1993 Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina, created the Mosaic browser. At the time there were multiple browsers, however the majority of them were Unix-based and naturally text heavy. There had been no integrated approach to graphic design elements such as images or sounds. The Mosaic browser broke this mould.[3] The W3C was created in October 1994 to "lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing common protocols that promote its evolution and ensure its interoperability."[4] This discouraged any one company from monopolizing a propriety browser and programming language, which could have altered the effect of the World Wide Web as a whole. The W3C continues to set standards, which can today be seen with JavaScript. In 1994 Andreessen formed Communications Corp. that later became known as Netscape Communications, the Netscape 0.9 browser. Netscape created its own HTML tags without regard to the traditional standards process. For example, Netscape 1.1 included tags for changing background colours and formatting text with tables on web pages. Throughout 1996 to 1999 the browser wars began, as Microsoft and Netscape fought for ultimate browser dominance. During this time there were many new technologies in the field, notably Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, and Dynamic HTML. On the whole, the browser competition did lead to many positive creations and helped web design evolve at a rapid pace.[5]
"You have a great basic product formula that appeals to entrepreneurs wanting to build their own web sites without any coding. If you continue to refine this basic concept — no code at all — the Mobirise website builder software will gain more and more users - do-it-yourself entrepreneurs - independent, freelance, contract, solo and other non-traditional workers.. If you add more prebuilt blocks to drag and drop into the web pages, that will help growth."
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